inside me

sacred rivers flood the harvest

the subtle taste of copper arouses

the hungry little crocodile inside me

she smiles, knowing as the Nile

 teeth draped languidly over lips

like ominous monoliths

a creature of precious predation

the absolution found here

drowns in the muddy waters

just as easily

saints and heretics

friends and enemies

they all taste the same

the hungry little crocodile inside me

she smiles, knowing as the Nile

vehemently obliges

a fool who refuses to see

the dangers of wading

with a pocket full of stones

 instead of posies

he who clings to empty promises

instead of prose

hoping to stay afloat

drifts with careless debris

toward a reckoning

oh, the delightful irritation

of wasted temptation

she smiles, knowing as the Nile

the hungry little crocodile inside me

a. duncan, 2018


 

How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale
How cheerfully he seems to grin
How neatly spreads his claws
And welcomes little fishes in
With gently smiling jaws!

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

     by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll)

“How Doth the Little Crocodile” is a parody of the moralistic poem “Against Idleness and Mischief” by Isaac Watts. Watts’ poem uses the bee as a model of hard work and virtue. In Carroll’s parody, the crocodile’s corresponding “virtues” are deception and predation, themes which recur throughout Alice’s adventures in both books.

How doth the little busy bee
Improve each shining hour,
And gather honey all the day
From every opening flower!

How skilfully she builds her cell!
How neat she spreads the wax!
And labors hard to store it well
With the sweet food she makes.

In works of labor or of skill,
I would be busy too;
For Satan finds some mischief still
For idle hands to do.

In books, or work, or healthful play,
Let my first years be passed,
That I may give for every day
Some good account at last.

Against Idleness and Mischief  

by English hymn-writer, theologian and logician Isaac Watts

“How Doth the Little Crocodile” is a parody of the moralistic poem “Against Idleness and Mischief” by Isaac Watts. Watts’ poem uses the bee as a model of hard work and virtue. In Carroll’s parody, the crocodile’s corresponding “virtues” are deception and predation, themes which recur throughout Alice’s adventures in both books.

 

 

 

 

Posted by

"She would fill endless notebooks with stories about the characters in her life, their impressions, words, friends, lovers, inspirations, fantasies. She spent her days dreaming up worlds where they fit together in visions; the if only, the never again, the someday. Those who knew her best would describe her as a creature with a clear and sometimes painful sense of herself; furious with ideas and convictions, to a point that she frightened love away with discernment and a relentless strength of character."

6 thoughts on “inside me

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s